Going Deeper

 

The Celtic Christians of the first millennium were acutely aware of the reality of spiritual warfare.  One of their favourite weapons was the Ionica or ‘breastplate prayer’ of which the hymn known as ‘Saint Patrick’s Breastplate’ is the most famous example.  These prayers were a conscious calling to mind of the encircling presence and protection of God.  Here is my attempt to express this weeks’ themes as the kind of prayer.  If it’s helpful you might want to copy or cut the page out and keep it with you to use whenever you need it.

 

This day I call on the God who protects me

            To guard me from Satan and keep me from sin.

I encircle my waist with the belt of his truthfulness:

            He is faithful and just and forgives all my sin.

I cover my body with the breastplate of righteousness:

            He crowns me with beauty and calls me his priest.

I strap to my feet the strong shoes of peace:

            I stand in his grace and he fills me with love.

I hold on my arm the shield of faith:

            He promises to bless me for all of my days.

I cover my head with the salvation helmet:

            My God is swift to rescue when evil attacks.

I take in my hand the sword of the Spirit:

            When I speak in Christ’s name the demons must flee.

I pray in the Spirit with all kinds of prayers:

            God hears my voice through the Spirit in me.

This day I call on the God who protects me

            To guard me from Satan and keep me from sin

I call on the name of the God who surrounds me

            Above me, beside me, and living within.

 

These prayers were a conscious calling to mind of the encircling presence and protection of God.

 

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The above was given to Jan and me by Margaret & John Leinster on a Sunday afternoon following a message on Ephesians 6, and the armor of God. 

 

Many thanks, Margaret ‘n John.

 

For further historical information on the Breastplate of St. Patrick, click HERE.

 

Web posted:  September 20, 2004

Updated:  January 4, 2012

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